Old Can Be New In Landscape Design

If you have been active in your garden space for more than a few years, you might remember the arrival of the New Zealand Flax as a trend in the 1990s. This episode was testimony to the fact that garden design is as susceptible to the influences of trends as architecture and fashion, with many great new discoveries and the occasional strategic mishit. When Flax was first introduced as a landscape plant, it was often used without a plan as a garden accent and surprised many unsuspecting gardeners when it catapulted up to 10 feet high and became the visual and spatial equivalent of a hostile-takeover.  In the following years, exotic and showy cultivars were developed.  Stunning varieties of Flax, such as the Phormuim ‘Jester’  returned to the catwalks of garden design as an annual or a focal point in a seasonal plantings. Today it is still a good option in the right setting.  Not always as hearty as the original variety, it may not last through a tough winter. Plan to use it as a short term addition to your landscape and you won’t be disappointed. It might survive, which would be an added treat.  If you are worried about trying marginally hearty species or experimenting with a new plant, think about trying it in a container or plant  just one in the perfect spot in your garden.  Then, see what happens!

With some of our emerging issues with climate change, temperature zones could shift just enough to impact what thrives in any given location. In fact, the USDA recently made small adjustments to a couple temperature zones in the southern United States.  Having worked as a garden designer in the Pacific Northwest for my entire career, I am in tune with the best plan picks for this area and subtle changes in the local environment that influence the best plant choice for any garden location.

Trends can be a positive and a fun way to experiment with seasonal changes.  You can also take trends in the opposite direction too. If you have an older and established Rhododendron, you can prune it and shape it to bring back an element of a classic look next to older homes and buildings.

I’ll never stop being captivated but what’s new, adjusting my vision on what is “old” and enjoying how this turns out in my garden space. If you are feeling restless about your garden space, think about adding something new. Give me a call and I am glad to help you experiment with this.

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